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About this collection

The fight against epidemics: The history of medicine is inseparable from the study of contagious diseases and the great epidemics: plague, tuberculosis, syphilis, cholera, yellow fever, typhus and leprosy.

 

The earliest studies in the fight against these epidemics were generally observations – the accuracy of which varied considerably – of the symptoms and suffering associated with them, which were at the root of countless myths and superstitions over the centuries.

 

It was not until the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries that work of a more rigorous scientific nature began to appear, alongside the emergence of epidemiology. Towards the mid-part of the ninteenth century a greater number of studies were published, as the discoveries of Pasteur and Koch opened the way to an abundance of research that accurately identified the causes of these diseases and defined the first strategies for overcoming them.

 
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